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Impact of negative feedback

Impact of negative feedback

Negative feedback is defined as any input or comments provided as a result of and adverse outcome in job performance. This form of feedback is most often used to improve performance but can very easily backfire on a manager.  Often negative feedback is given with a position of authority and superiority which is a large blind spot and one of the largest contributors to managers being rated poorly and having low productivity and poor retention.

According to a study by Joseph Rosse and Howard Miller the best approach to negative feedback is to approach employees from their level with an attitude of problem-solving. Too often the result of negative feedback is counterproductive behavior such as retaliation, exits, or general neglect going forward.

Another hurdle to face with negative feedback is the associated with the impact of the negative feedback bias. This theory states that even though people might receive several doses of positive feedback they will always place more emphasis and more importance on negative feedback given even if a performance review is overwhelmingly positive. Psychologists say that negative thoughts take more neurons to process and thus naturally consume a larger part of our thoughts.

Alton Simmons is a good example of providing negative feedback in the form of a traffic ticket. Alton has 0 complaints from citizens reported to the department. Over the last 20 years after more than 25,000 traffic stops this officer has received 0 complaints.

Alton says he never looks at himself as a position of authority. He simply sees their behavior as a temporary problem and tries to help them solve it with a good attitude.  As one driver stated “I’ve never been so happy to get a speeding ticket in all my life. This was the best part of my day so far!”.

Influence of positive feedback

Influence of positive feedback

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Can you think of a time when some good timely feedback made the difference in your career? Can you remember a few times when feedback steered you in the right direction and improved your performance, but was delivered with the precision of a sledge hammer. Not only did it damage your relationship with your  manager it affected your confidence when dealing with customers. It’s not that you didn’t appreciate the feedback but it was not delivered strategically.

Many times performance feedback is not given at all and we tend to find out about it when a project fails or a customer or employees leaves or when we lose a big deal. There are clear strategies to provide feedback in a precise timely strategic manner that will both engage and develop the employee and not make them ashamed or embarrassed causing disengagement.

Positive Feedback

Great managers give regular feedback as part of their daily work. Great managers know which type of feedback to give according to the individual and the situation. One method for providing feedback is positive feedback. When someone is given positive feedback from a great performance they are more likely to repeat that behavior again and again. Positive feedback:

  1.       Indicates what aspects of your performance is most important.
  2.       Gives employees and sense of control and achievement.
  3.       Helps employees set future performance goals.
  4.        Supercharges engagement and learning

Expectations

Richard Rosenthal and Lenore Jacobsen conducted an experiment in an elementary school in the 1960’s. They gave students a mick IQ test and chose students at random and gave them the following feedback. They identified a random group and labeled them as intellectual bloomers. This group who was randomly selected proved to constantly score higher on future exams. This is known as the Pygmalion Effect.  This theory states that positive expectations are directly related to positive performance outcomes. Positive expectations need to be provided to both over performing, average and underperforming employees as well. Positive employees produce positive results.

How to perform well In a video interview

How to perform well In a video interview

Over the last decade, our lives have changed considerably, as new technology is constantly being implemented. Modern technology is changing the world we live in: our work, education, daily activities, and now, the recruitment process. Over the years, video calls have become more reliable and ubiquitous than ever and it has become part of our everyday life.

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Video interviews are gaining widespread acceptance in corporate recruiting process. Currently, numerous companies are developing platforms to conduct video interviews in order to recruit potential candidates. These new platforms are exceptionally convenient, allowing them to evaluate each candidate without taking the time to meet them face-to-face.

A video interview works the same way as a face-to-face interview; the interviewer asks a series of questions to the candidate and evaluates them based on their knowledge and how they present themselves. The latter can get quite nerve-racking, as many of us might feel uncomfortable and uneasy talking to someone unfamiliar and trying to convince them why they’re the best for the job. However, instead of struggling and avoiding video interviews altogether, we have devised a few tips on how to overcome your fear and impress the employer.

  • Practice

    As a famous author once said, “Practice doesn’t make perfect. Practice reduces the imperfection.” Before a video interview, practice answering potential questions and general questions about yourself. Try speaking in front of a mirror to further improve your facial expressions; this will definitely carry on to the interview, as you will feel confident in what you are saying.

  • Dress professionall

     When choosing your attire, it is essential that you dress appropriately. By dressing professionally, you convey a great impression to the interviewer and let them know that you are serious for the position. Additionally, dress in light colors against a dark background and dark colors against a light background. Plan ahead and keep your clothes ready for the interview well in advance. Remember, “You cannot climb the ladder of success dressed in a costume of failure.”

  • Be confident

    In a video interview, it is necessary to exhibit yourself as someone who is confident of themselves and in what they do. In order to accomplish this, look directly at the camera and not at the screen. By looking directly at the interviewer, whatever you say will be more effective and will be taken more seriously. Nod and smile to further show your interest in the interview. Additionally, verbalize and articulate your words clearly and loudly so that you can express all of your thoughts and ideas.

  • Create a list of questions to ask the interviewer

    After the interviewer evaluates you and asks all the questions necessary, you are typically given the opportunity to ask some questions of your own. Having this in mind, create a list of questions beforehand to ask the interviewer. For example, you can ask about the management style of the company, the prospects for growth, or aspects of the company culture.

Clearly, video interviews are becoming the new norm in the recruitment process. It is to your advantage that you adapt to the modern times sooner – embrace video interviews and take the upper hand in the competitive job market.

Preparing for Your Interview

Preparing for Your Interview

Preparing for an interview can be a nerve-wracking experience. Follow these steps to ensure you are ready when you step into that room.

  1. Research the Company – Nothing sends an interview into a downward spiral like a candidate not having any background information on the hiring company. Looking through the company’s website and social media can reveal a lot about what they do and how they function.
  1. List Keywords – Create a list of keywords you would like to remember. Whether they are about your work experience, the industry, or why you should be hired, writing these words down and having context around them will help you remember them during the interview.
  1. Get Sleep – Make sure you get a good night’s sleep the night before your interview. Being well rested will allow you to be more alert and on top of your game when answering questions and interacting with the hiring managers.
  1. Have an Outfit Ready – Do not spend your morning worrying about what to wear. Have the outfit already picked out and set aside. This will also prevent last minute emergencies of finding stains or tears on clothes.
  1. Eat Breakfast – Going into an interview on an empty stomach can throw you off. You will not be as alert or focused as having had a healthy, filling breakfast beforehand.
  1. Decide on Questions – Know the questions you will ask your interviewers ahead of time. Pick questions based on your research of the company or from the job description. Having questions prepared shows your interest and professionalism.
  1. Breathe – It’s natural to get anxious before an interview. Many people get a little flustered, sweaty, shaky, or red. To help calm your nerves, don’t forget to breathe. Take a couple deep breaths as you walk in, smile, and get ready to shine!