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Category: Interview Evaluation

Release Announcement: Mobile Video Interviews

Release Announcement: Mobile Video Interviews

The EasyHire.me Team is thrilled to announce the general availability of its mobile interface for on-demand interviews. Job seekers can now use their iPhone or Android phones/tablets to take on-demand interviews anytime and anywhere.  All interviews are recorded and available for grading and sharing within the hiring team upon completion.

Benefits of Mobile Video Interviews:

  • No webcam, no problem. Candidates without a computer or webcam are still able to complete video interview via their mobile device.
  • Interview anytime, anywhere. Need to interview while vacationing or during your lunch break? Sure! Simply pull out your smartphone and take your interview anytime, anywhere.
  • High Definition video recording. Modern smartphones have better cameras than most computers.  Candidates can reliably capture high definition video.

How it works:

The EasyHire.me Mobile Video Interviews do not require candidates to download and install any custom mobile applications. This feature works right from the build-in Safari (iOS) or Chrome (Android) browsers, making it taking interviews easier than ever!

Mobile video interviews enable candidates to complete their assessments faster, so the hiring team can accelerate its hiring decision and ultimately the overall hiring process.

At EasyHire.me we strongly believe that mobile video technologies give hiring teams the much-needed edge in today’s competitive talent market.

Contact us at sales@easyhire.me to learn more or sign up now to accelerate your hiring!

The many layers of interviewing: Unfold the process with EasyHire.me

The many layers of interviewing: Unfold the process with EasyHire.me

You are using EasyHire’s interview platform to interview new candidates. You are consistently going through each question, listening intently to each answer, and carefully rating responses. But what are you actually listening for? How do you take subjective answers and make them objective, allowing you to compare apples to apples? 

Let’s investigate what employers are thinking when candidates are answering questions and how EasyHire can help incorporate these concepts in their interview process in a structured and objective manner.

  1. Likeability. Do I like this person? Will they get along with the rest of the team? Can I spend 8+ hours a day with them? What is the cultural fit? By including “cultural fit” and/or “likability” as measures on the scorecard, employers can rate candidates on a 5-star rating system.
  2. Genuineness. Is this person who they say they are? Do their experiences and language seem congruent with their application? Does the candidate genuinely want to work here? Can I trust this person? Ask in your interview process “Why do you want to work at Company X?” Genuineness can be measured from the candidate’s answer.
  3. Competency. Can the person do the job for which they are applying? Do they reference skills and knowledge relevant to the position? EasyHire.me allows employers to internally list skills, knowledge, and other competencies to be rated for each candidate in the platform, allowing for easy comparison of candidates.
  4. Positivity. Does the candidate seem to have a positive outlook? Do they speak poorly of their previous position or supervisors? When speaking of situations that didn’t go well, does the candidate focus on the negatives or do they express the things they learned to improve for next time? Include “positivity” as a measure or ask questions that get to the heart of a candidate’s outlook.
  5. Uniqueness. Is this candidate memorable (for the right reasons!)? Would they bring something new and different to the company? Are they better than the rest and stand out as someone you want on your team? Simply asking “tell me what makes you unique” or “why should we pick you out of all the other candidates” can yield some telling results related to uniqueness. Additionally, the way a candidate presents themselves, their variety of experiences, and how they tell a story might give them a 5-star rating in the “uniqueness” measure.
  6. Employer knowledge. Did the candidate spend the time to get to know the company and what they are about? Do they know the job description well and understand how they will contribute in the position? Do they reference company projects and initiatives while relating their skills? Including “employer research” as a measure can help employers compare candidates who took a cursory look at the website against those who really spent some time understanding what the company is about.

Although objective answers to questions in an interview are very important, subjective concepts, such as genuineness and uniqueness cannot be forgotten. Let EasyHire help you navigate both objective and subjective scores and find the best candidate for the position.

Why and how employers ask the questions they do

Why and how employers ask the questions they do

“Tell me about yourself”

“Why should we hire you?”

“Why is a manhole cover round?”*

“Tell us about a time you worked on a team that went better than expected and a time that went worse than expected”

“Please use the whiteboard to write the Java code for……”

There are many types of questions employers may ask in an interview and there are reasons for each:

  • Get to know you questions. These are asked with an intent of learning about the candidate, including their goals, education, and past experiences. Interviewers learn more about the candidate’s personality, their credentials, and motivation for interviewing.
  • Behavioral questions. Questions centered around past experiences or hypothetical situations have one goal in mind: past behavior predicts future behavior. If a candidate describes what they’ve done or would do in a situation that doesn’t mesh with the mindset of the company or the goals of the interviewer, there’s a good chance the interview process won’t move forward.
  • Brainteaser questions. You probably don’t know how many gas stations there are in the US (Microsoft interview question) or the annual revenue of the Starbucks in Times Square (Morgan Stanley interview question). Interviewers are less interested in the right answer, but more curious to know your creativity, thought process, and, perhaps most telling, your ability to think under pressure.
  • Technical questions. For candidates applying for technical positions, employers not only want to hear about knowledge, skills, and experiences relevant to the field, they want to see it with their own eyes. Candidates may be asked to code in Java or create something in Photoshop. EasyHire’s in-built code-editor makes it super easy to conduct technical interviews

Integrating the variety of questions in a meaningful and structured manner is important for both employer and candidate. EasyHire’s interview management system is one way to keep interviews on track.

Employers can structure interviews by specifying the skills, knowledge, and abilities required for the job. They formulate the evaluation criteria when compiling interview questions and a rating scale before the interview. Once the interview is in a process, employers ask questions while making notes and rating the candidates’ responses. Keeping questions consistent and structure is also important for employers because discrimination and hiring bias may be reduced, ensuring a more fair hiring process.

Candidates benefit from structured interviews in a number of ways as well. A candidate might feel the process is more professional and consistent when an employer uses EasyHire (don’t forget: interviews are also a time for a candidate to decide whether the employer is a good fit for them!). Additionally, one of the features of EasyHire, the interactive platform that puts the question on the screen, allows a candidate to read the question, reducing the chance of mishearing the question.

Although the interview process can be cumbersome and intimidating for both sides of the conference table, interview questions are a necessary way for employers to get to know a candidate beyond the information in a resume and cover letter. Do we like this person? Are they a good fit? Can they do the job? Pick the best candidate with EasyHire’s easy-to-use interview management platform.

*A manhole cover is round because it cannot fall through its circular opening and is easily moved and rolled.

How do you fight bias in your hiring process?

How do you fight bias in your hiring process?

Hiring bias is something that affects everyone whether you are a candidate being overlooked or an employer unconsciously making a biased hiring decision. Fighting bias is a choice and more companies are starting to make that choice in their recruitment process and reaping the rewards of a team built on diversity.

Hiring bias can take many forms: the way the job posting is written; the effect of the name, age, and pedigree of the applicant;  what questions are asked in the interview and more. Employers need to be aware of their hiring bias whether it is conscious or not while asking themselves the bigger question – what aspect of the company culture is fueling the hiring bias in the first place?

Today many resources are available to the companies to reduce unconscious biases which in turn will bring diversity into the workforce. EasyHire.me recognizes that the interview process is potentially the gateway to many of the biases that influence the hiring process which in turn shapes the company’s culture. EasyHire.me’s interview management platform helps employers to conduct a more consistent interview across all applicants ensuring that every candidate gets a fair chance. Hiring managers can create pre-defined questions to evaluate the candidates which help the interviewers to stay on track during the selection process, put their biases aside and discover the best candidates.

In technology industries specifically, knowledge and skills create a strong candidate. Many a times employers have been less likely to interview a female candidate, an LGBTQ-identified applicant, an older applicant due to biases of who should “represent” the tech world. EasyHire.me’s interviewing tools and processes can help companies take the first step forward in hiring people based on “who can do the job well” and not “who they are”. This will not only help the companies find strong candidates but also bring diversity to the workplace. In a time of a technology boom, combined with an increasingly diverse community of technical applicants, it is important to face hiring bias and stop denying it exists.

Integrated code-editor for technical interviews

Integrated code-editor for technical interviews

EasyHire.me provides an integrated code editor for conducting effective technical interviews.  The candidates can choose to code in their favorite coding language (C/C++, Java, Javascript, Python, Perl etc.) using the inbuilt code-editor. Whether it is an on-demand or live interview, the ability to write code, compile, and test all  in one place makes it easy for the candidates to display their programming strength.

EasyHire.me tags the code snippet along with the question and makes it available to the hiring team as part of the interview report. Below is the screenshot of the interview report of a candidate. Note that you can look at the interview question, listen to the candidate’s response, and review the coding skills, all at the same time.

Screen Shot 2016-04-29 at 1.51.38 PM

With EasyHire.me, you can effectively pre-screen technical talent much earlier in your hiring cycle.

Structured interview – an easy upgrade to your hiring process

Structured interview – an easy upgrade to your hiring process

1. Understand the job requirement

Specifying the job requirements clearly is the first step in the hiring process. Not only can it help dictate the open dialogue between you as an interviewer and the candidate, but also save your staffing team valuable time in their sourcing efforts.

Writing a good job description requires an understanding of company’s roadmap and timeline, both from a business and product perspective. In other words, address today’s needs, while also envisioning what the role would be a year from now.

For example, let’s say, you are looking to hire a Sales Development Representative. Your current need may be to generate more leads and revenue. However, you envision this hire to transition into a marketing role down the road. What would be the job requirements? Are you looking for someone to setup drip campaign or are you someone to do social marketing,

It may be wise to create a generic job description that emphasizes on expectations and accountabilities, rather than specific tasks, thereby encouraging employees to focus on results rather than job duties. We would suggest that you understand the role and responsibilities and write a more wide-ranging job description. A little extra time spent in compiling a good job description would help your recruiting teams efforts in finding the right candidate, faster!

2. Identify the key competencies 

Identify the most important competencies that should be evaluated during the interview. Define the key competencies that are must have and good to have. It is important that the hiring team understand the skills that are important for the job. Ideally, it would be great to get a candidate who has all the desired key competencies but most often you have limited time and so would have to compromise and pick the best available candidate. It would be helpful if the team has a prioritized list of key competencies that you are looking for in the candidates. Next step is to develop a list of questions to evaluate the competencies. Three to six competencies are typically assessed, and one to three questions might be developed around each competencies.

3. Develop questions around each competency

The next step is to develop questions to evaluate each of the identified competencies. All candidates should be asked a similar set of questions to bring consistency in the interview and evaluation process. For example, a key competency for manager often entails the ability to resolve differences within the team. Plan on asking questions that would give an insight on the candidate’s approach in solving such conflicts. The questions may include something like “Describe a time when you had conflicting ideas about the strategy of a project. Describe the situation? How did you help the team to resolve this conflict?” If it is a software engineering position which requires specific language skills, plan to have a specific question on coding that entails the candidate to write a snippet of code.

4. Define the metric scale 

Metrics are essential in today’s labor force. Not only do they help gauge overall performance, but can also be the driving factor for making hiring decisions. As you structure your interview process, it is important to identify the types of specific behaviors and descriptors that can be used to evaluate the candidate’s actions. These anchors are typically developed around a three or five-point scale. Define the metric scale and format to capture the factors that are important to the job position as well as for the company. Next, define the standards for rating so that all the evaluation across interviewers are normalized. Here are two factors to keep in mind:

  • Relevant metrics to a role: Measure a candidate on similar metrics to what their role entails. For example, if you are interviewing a Marketing candidate, your objective may be to read a sample writing a piece on the spot.
  • Qualitative vs. Quantitative: Being able to reduce subjectivity in the interview process is important. We are a product of our environment and as such, do bring our personal biases in the hiring process. We can reduce these biases by quantifying the candidates on the set of objectives with a well defined metric scale 

In the end, a structured approach to interviewing and decision-making process will help you in scaling the team, faster.

What type of interviewer are you?

What type of interviewer are you?

Interviewing is an art! It is a self taught skill that you need to learn and master yourself.  There is no clear-cut course that teaches you how to be a good interviewer. An effective interviewer makes their candidate feel comfortable and relaxed to bring the best out of them in order to ascertain what skills they can bring to the table. They inspire the candidate to want to be part of their initiative and engage them in introspective discussions. They make the candidate contemplate on how they can improve themselves and their peers.

You can be more successful as an interviewer by being conscious as to whom you are interviewing. Before commencing the interview, first establish the role and the job you are interviewing the candidate for. Are you interviewing for a customer facing role or a product development role? Additionally, while interviewing, be aware of the type of person you are talking to. Are you talking to a fresh graduate or an industry veteran? Would the candidate be reporting to you or would he be joining the team as your peer? These are but few of the factors that you should consider before initiating the interview. By analyzing and deciding all of these factors, you can pick a candidate who is best suitable for your work style and the job at hand, and hopefully, a long-term contributor to your company.

Here are some crucial qualities that you can pick from as the interviewer:

  • Assertive: If you are going to be their manager, establish the company’s hierarchy and accountability in a positive manner. Act like his manager and give the candidate a realistic glimpse on how you see them fitting in your company.
  • Collaborative: If you are interviewing your peer, solve problems together with the candidate. Your interview should aim in not only finding out how suitable the candidate is for the job but also how good it is to work with him.
  • Inquisitive: If you are interviewing your boss, talk about his vision and plans for the company and evaluate if he has the abilities to execute on them. Share your passion and commitment towards the job and find out if they are aligned with his.

Your evaluation on the candidate should depend on the interview session. If you were a tough interviewer, go easy on the evaluation. If you were collaborative and friendly, be tough on the evaluation. Finally, the choice is yours to pick a persona and conduct the interview accordingly.  Plan ahead – study the candidate, choose the appropriate persona, and provide a rounded, insightful evaluation on the candidate.

Benefits of a Structured Interview

Benefits of a Structured Interview

Has anyone in the history of hiring ever employed anyone without conducting some type of interview? Seriously doubt it! Interview is an important process when you decide whether to allow the “outsider” into the “family” or not. There have been volumes written about how the first five minutes of an interview decide whether you get the job or not. Instead of collecting objective data, the hiring decisions are influenced by gut feelings of the interviewer.

…“the first five minutes” of an interview are what really matter, describing how interviewers make initial assessments and spend the rest of the interview working to confirm those assessments. So, if they like you, they look for reasons to like you more. If they don’t like your handshake or the awkward introduction, then the interview is essentially over because they spend the rest of the meeting looking for reasons to reject you. –  Lazlo Bock, Google’s Senior Vice President of People Operations

Let’s understand the goal of interview process. It is to achieve a good fit between the people and the jobs.  The interview process determines how the candidate will perform once they join the team.  So it is important that the selection process is based on a scientific approach and not on gut feelings. Scientific approach involves administering a structured interview where the knowledge, skills and abilities required for the job are assessed in a systematic manner across candidates.

“The interview structure, an interviewer’s experience and the number of people being interviewed in succession all play a role in the decision making on a job candidate,”  said Patrick Raymark, psychology department chair at Clemson University.

A good interview process involves collecting unbiased data on the candidates that enables the hiring manager to make the right hire. To make such critical decision, the interview process should aim to collect data that assures that the person is the best fit. Unfortunately, most interviews predict an applicant’s actual ability only between 1% to 4% accuracy.  This can be minimized and almost eliminated by adopting a structured interview approach.

What is a Structured Interview Process?

  • Before the interview – Plan end to end. Post the job and source the candidates. Before interviewing, define the evaluation criteria and rating scales. Put together a set of appropriate interview questions for assessing the candidates.
  • During the interview – Conduct an engaged interview session. Ask each candidate the same set of questions in the same order if possible. Take detailed interview notes for each question. Use the evaluation criteria and scale to rate the candidate’s response.
  • After the interview – Compare all the candidates interviewed by all the interviewers. Analyze the interviews and ratings and normalize the evaluation data across interviewers. Then, make a data-driven decision on who best fits the role.

On the onset, structured interviews seem tedious but in reality it is a highly effective hiring process. Adopting an end-to-end structured approach shortens the overall hiring time.

The best part of the structured interview is that it is effective, consistent and fair. All candidates go through the same process, are treated objectively and asked the same set of questions. Each interviewer is focused in asking the relevant set of questions and evaluates the candidates based on the job criteria.  Since the hiring managers have the same set of  information for every candidate, the hiring decisions are made faster and with greater confidence.

How do you run your job interviews – unstructured or structured?

How do you run your job interviews – unstructured or structured?

This is a four-part series that discusses structured interviews. The upcoming articles in the series are “Pitfalls of unstructured interviews,” “Benefits of structured interviews,” and “How easyhire.me can help you run a structured Interview.”

Interviews without a specific format are referred to as unstructured interviews. Unstructured interviews are unplanned. They tends to be free flowing with the interviewer asking questions spontaneously based on the candidate’s responses and proceed like a friendly conversation.  As a result they vary across candidates and are inconsistent in the way the candidates are evaluated.

At the other end, structured interviews are based on thorough analysis of the job requirements and in-depth understanding of knowledge, skills and abilities (KSA’s) required to perform the job. On the basis of the analysis, interview questions and scorecards are crafted. The candidates are asked the same questions and their responses are assessed in a standardized manner against job-specific criteria using a predetermined scorecard.

Structuring the interview selection process reduces the magnitude of interviewers’ biases, enhancing the reliability and validity of the interview decisions. Overall, structured interviews help in establishing a clear link between performance as a candidate at the job interview and performance as an employee on the job.

The table below compares the two approaches. Use the table below to determine if your interviews are unstructured or structured.

Unstructured Interviews

  • Little or no planning of the interview session.
  • The evaluation criteria used by interviewers vary across applicants.
  • The interview questions are not pre-planned. They are spontaneous and free flowing.
  • Interview sessions are not consistent across applicants of the same job.
  • Little or no control over the type or amount of information collected across applicants.
  • Irrelevant information influences the direction of the interview.
  • There is no emphasis on note-taking or maintaining interview records.
  • No standardized metric is used in rating the applicant.
  • The interviewer’s personal biases influence the evaluation of the candidate.
  • No formal training is provided to the interview team.

Structured Interviews

  • There is careful planning of interview objectives and evaluation criteria.
  • The factors evaluated by the interviewers are based on a thorough job analysis and are consistent across candidates.
  • Interview questions are pre-determined and linked to job criteria (Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities).
  • The applicants of a particular job are asked the same questions.
  • Questions are planned and controlled. Same sets of questions are asked across applicants.
  • Irrelevant information is disregarded.
  • Detailed notes are taken during the interview session that is shared, analyzed, and stored.
  • Applicants are rated and scored based on a standardized metric created for the job.
  • The interviewer’s personal biases have less influence than the ratings across different job related parameters.
  • The talent acquisition team is provided with the interview template and rating metric before conducting the interviews.


Research shows that structuring the interview process reduces the influence of interviewer’s personal biases in the selection process. It also increases the reliability and validity of the interviewer’s judgement. In other words, structured interview results improve the quality of hire in the organization.

easyhire.me platform provides all the elements for conducting a structured interview.  Plan your interviews ahead by choosing a series of question from easyhire.me question bank and crafting the scorecard attributes. Run an efficient interview using easyhire.me’s Interview Room – it features video, code editor, and scorecards all in one place. Record and track the interviews for a data driven decision making.

Giving Hiring Managers the Power

Giving Hiring Managers the Power

An article was published on April 8, 2015 titled “The 7-Step Hiring Blueprint that Built Netflix” by Carlie Smith (http://bit.ly/1cmBBPK). In step six, Smith discusses the importance of a hiring manager taking charge of the interview process.

Many of the tips focus around organization and quick and effective communication to ensure the best candidate is hired. EasyHire recognizes the deep importance of this part of the interviewing and hiring process and has developed its platform around these very concepts.

It is essential that an accurate impression be given from the beginning. Candidates strive to articulate their skills and ability to perform the job in the hopes of being hired. But what about the first impression of the company? It is often overlooked that companies also need to provide detailed insight into the company culture and team dynamics. EasyHire makes this easy for hiring managers by allowing them to immediately showcase the top tier communication skills and technology they value. A problematic or chaotic hiring process can make a qualified, perfect candidate turn down an offer. But by using a platform that makes the process easy, efficient, and advanced, the candidate is immediately aware of the company’s smart business sense.

The article also discussed how involved a hiring manager should be when interacting with candidates before and after the interview process. We all know that making time is a challenge for most business professionals. However, EasyHire’s video-based platform makes it simpler to conduct interviews anytime, anywhere. Interviews should no longer be confined to a stuffy conference room. Video interviews avoid the confusion and hassle of finding a time that works in everyone’s busy schedule to meet in person.

The last topic we found interesting in Smith’s article was her suggestion to use an “interview scorecard.” And here, we have more great news: EasyHire has this built into its platform! No longer worry about keeping notes, figuring out which questions where used by which interviewer. Our platform allows the hiring managers and their team to keep the process organized and in one place.

EasyHire.me is a manager-centric product with workflows that fit the hiring manager’s needs. Smith’s article shows the importance of creating a blueprint to establish a successful business. Whether you are a small company or a sprawling, well-known business, hiring is important so don’t skimp on finding the best talent in the best way possible.